The foresight of market strategists is shaky, but their hindsight is always impressive.

This Week/Sept. 17-23

FILE FOR COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID. Hoping for grants and loans for the 2018–19 academic year? You can file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid starting Oct. 1. Income is based on your 2016 tax return. Even so, before filling out the FAFSA, you could increase aid eligibility by using taxable account money to pay down debt or fund retirement accounts.

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Money Guide

Everything you need to be smarter about money—all in one place.

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Beneficiary Designations

WHEN YOU OPEN A RETIREMENT account or purchase life insurance, you usually name beneficiaries to inherit these assets. This is also true when you set up a trust. Because much of your wealth may be in IRAs, 401(k) plans and similar accounts, it’s crucial you have the right beneficiaries listed. Divorced? If you don’t change the beneficiaries on your retirement accounts, your ex-spouse may get the last laugh.

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Latest Blog Posts

Debt: 10 Questions to Ask

GOT DEBT? To get a handle on the situation and figure out whether you’re handling your loans and credit cards properly, here are 10 questions to ask:

What’s your net worth? You might have a home and sizable financial accounts. But what are you worth once you subtract all your debts?
Are you taking the necessary steps to stop thieves from borrowing money using your identity? To protect yourself, regularly check your credit reports for errors and accounts you don’t recognize,

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Excuses, Excuses

WE MAKE ALL KINDS of financial mistakes: spend too much, borrow too much, buy expensive investment products, try to beat the market. To be sure, there are some folks who simply don’t know better. But others give the issue serious thought—and still act foolishly, justifying their behavior with cockamamie arguments. Here are five such justifications that I’ve heard in recent months:
 1. “It’s okay to spend money if it cheers me up.” This is the crack cocaine school of budgeting.

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Moving On

WHEN TALKING WITH HOME SELLERS, I’ve long ceased being surprised by how many routinely overlook or fail to take maximum advantage of a valuable tax break: the exclusion when unloading their principal residence.
The exclusion—meaning you pay no taxes—is capped at $500,000 for married couples filing jointly and $250,000 for singles and married couples filing separate returns. I frequently need to remind sellers that these exclusions apply to profits, not sales prices.

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Money Guide

Everything you need to be smarter about money—all in one place.

Start Here

Beneficiary Designations

WHEN YOU OPEN A RETIREMENT account or purchase life insurance, you usually name beneficiaries to inherit these assets. This is also true when you set up a trust. Because much of your wealth may be in IRAs, 401(k) plans and similar accounts, it’s crucial you have the right beneficiaries listed. Divorced? If you don’t change the beneficiaries on your retirement accounts, your ex-spouse may get the last laugh.

Read more »

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Out of My Mind

IF WE HAVE DINNER with half-a-dozen others, we might all share the same meal and yet each of us will have a different experience—sometimes radically different. Even as we talk politics, crack jokes and swap gossip, we’ll each have our own thoughts whirling in the background: errands we can’t forget, work issues we need to resolve, incidents from the day we keep replaying, worries we can’t put behind us.
For me, those whirling background thoughts often concern financial notions I want to write about.

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Jonathan Clements

About Jonathan

Jonathan Clements is the founder and editor of HumbleDollar. He spent almost two decades at The Wall Street Journal, where he was the personal finance columnist. His latest book: How to Think About Money.

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